Slideshow: Ten years of the Doris McCarthy Gallery

The Doris McCarthy Gallery opened on March 11, 2004 with the exhibition Everything Which Is Yes, featuring work by gallery namesake Doris McCarthy.
The Doris McCarthy Gallery opened on March 11, 2004 with the exhibition Everything Which Is Yes, featuring work by gallery namesake Doris McCarthy.
  • The Doris McCarthy Gallery opened on March 11, 2004 with the exhibition Everything Which Is Yes, featuring work by gallery namesake Doris McCarthy.
  • Little Breeze (November 11 – December 19, 2004) was an interactive installation by Toronto artist Nina Levitt that examined the ephemeral presence of women spies during World War II.
  • The exhibition Return, Afghanistan (March 16 - May 12, 2006) was the result of photographer Zalmaï’s return to his native Afghanistan under the auspices of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees. The opening reception featured remarks by Omar Samad, Afghanistan Ambassador to Canada, and traditional Afghan food, music and dance, including an attan performance by UTSC’s Afghan Student Body.
  • Post Object (January 18 - March 11, 2007) presented works by five artists who put forward different ways of thinking about and through the object: Michael Joo, Kimsooja, Samina Mansuri, Pushpamala N. and Ravinder Reddy. The exhibition was co-presented with SAVAC (South Asian Visual Arts Centre).
  • A gallery visitor examines drawings by Toronto-based artist Ron Giii, part of the survey exhibition Hegel’s Salt Man (September 11 – October 21, 2007).
  • Students interact with Bill Burn’s installation Bird Radio, a chandelier of jerry-rigged objects mimicking birdcalls. Radio signals transmitted the sound of the calls outside of the gallery space (October 29 – December 14, 2008).
  • Breathing Under Water (September 17 - October 19, 2008) was an interactive installation by Haligonian artist Glynis Humphrey that featured large suspended, inflatable forms – each resonated with low sounds, inviting both touching and listening.
  • Artist Jon Sasaki offered free Sno-Kones in the dead of winter as part of his exhibition Good Intentions (January 13 - February 24, 2010). Sasaki’s work investigates an eternal optimism that, while endearing and charming, is filled with the trappings of failure. The DMG presentation kicked off a seven-gallery tour of the exhibition.
  • You May Find Yourself (March 3 – April 14, 2010) featured the late artist Peter Smith’s wall assemblages, sculptures, and large-scale prints. Packed with images, textures and colour, the works use the detritus of our days - scrap wood, pom poms, dollar store items - to express a unique perspective on the urban experience.
  • Gordon Monahan’s Piano Airlift (2006) was presented at the DMG as part of Seeing Sound (March 2 – April 13, 2011) a multi-venue, thirty-year overview of the renowned sound and multimedia artist’s career. The exhibition also marked the DMG's first-ever outdoor installation with A Piano Listening to Itself (2011) in the H-Wing Patio area.
  • Inbetween (January 19 - February 20, 2011) was a group exhibition exploring ideas of physical and psychological space. Included in the exhibition were Micah Lexier’s Book Sculptures: Brothers (Bunk Bed) (1993) and Richard Storms’ painting Hibiscus (2002), the latter of which is in the collection of the Doris McCarthy Gallery.
  • To accompany their exhibition Super It (September 6 - November 2, 2011) artist collective Blue Republic worked with students and faculty to create temporary drawings with water - an extension of their Water Drawings series - across campus.
  • The DMG welcomed the kindergarten class from the local child care centre, N'sheemaehn, for an artmaking session. After a tour of David R. Harper: Entre le chien et le loup (February 6 - April 6, 2013), the children created paper animal masks, inspired by Harper's installation A Fear of Unknown Origins (II) (2012).
  • For The Lion’s Share (September 4 - October 27, 2012), Calgary-based artist Rita McKeough created a simulated restaurant in the DMG with found and constructed objects, kinetics and sound, using a humorous and dream-like scenario to raise questions about the complexities of our relationship to eating animals.
  • The DMG celebrates its tenth anniversary with Glam North (February 26 – April 26, 2014), an exhibition that pays tribute to Doris McCarthy’s depictions of the Canadian North, alongside eight contemporary artists whose works look to nature to cast a light on contemporary life.